David Element

Wildlife Photography and Digital Video Images

______________________________________________________________ Birds 11 – European Robins

 

 

 

                                                                                        EUROPEAN ROBIN Erithacus rubecula (m)

 

 

                                                                           EUROPEAN ROBIN Erithacus rubecula (m, juvenile)

 

 

                                                                                        EUROPEAN ROBIN Erithacus rubecula (m)

 

 

                                                                                EUROPEAN ROBIN Erithacus rubecula (juvenile)

 

 

                                                                                EUROPEAN ROBIN Erithacus rubecula (juvenile)

 

 

                                                                                        EUROPEAN ROBIN Erithacus rubecula (m)

 

 

                                                                                        EUROPEAN ROBIN Erithacus rubecula (m)

 

 

                                                                                        EUROPEAN ROBIN Erithacus rubecula (m)

 

 

                                                                                        EUROPEAN ROBIN Erithacus rubecula (m)

 

 

                                                                                        EUROPEAN ROBIN Erithacus rubecula (m)

 

 

 

·         This sequence of photographs is of the same male European Robin Erithacus rubecula and of the one known surviving chick from his first brood. By the time that the baby was ousted prior to the production of a second brood it had already become hand-tame. Every once in a while an individual bird may become extremely confiding and in this case no bait was required other than the disturbance of a pile of wood-chippings in order to obtain his loyalty. The photographer simply needed to put in an appearance in the Robin’s territory (in a local park) in order to be able to obtain ridiculously close photographs and film of this extremely obliging little bird – this relationship was to continue for 19 months by which time (by Robin standards) had had survived for a long time. None of these photographs have been cropped and they were taken with a 105mm macro lens attached to a Nikon D7200 camera body with an internal 1.3x in-built magnifier (although this was not required for some of the images).  The Robin readily fed from the photographer’s hand and (once reassured) from the hands of others accompanying him, much to their delight. One film sequence ended abruptly when the bird hopped up into the one place where it could not be filmed – on the video camera’s preview screen, where it sat for about 30 seconds! The Robin’s mate was by comparison completely disinterested in the photographer and she maintained a much lower profile in the background. She lacked the orange wing-flashes that had become more conspicuous on the wings of the male bird during his second year. The sunbathing photograph is of interest as the Robin would actually make use of the photographer’s presence for added security in the knowledge that no predators would approach him. This meant not only that he would engage in this behaviour following the photographer’s arrival on hot days but also that it would then be possible to kneel down beside him to take close-up photographs! There are two films of this behaviour on-line that can be viewed by following the hyperlink below. He would habitually scan the sky every two seconds (or occasionally three) for potential danger throughout the day. It is also worth noting that live food would always be taken first in preference to any broken pine nuts that might be offered so they were sometimes collected after he had filled his bill with insects beforehand. He was never greedy and would never take nuts in excess, even when feeding his young. Also of interest is the fact that he would happily take insects with warning colours or distasteful properties such as the Harlequin Ladybird Harmonia axyridis shown in the penultimate photograph.

 

·         A series of David’s short films of European Robin behaviour may be found on his DavidPElement YouTube channel, no fewer than twenty four of them featuring this individual: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4AirIEc0NoflJygVoI-p7XmD6Pjv2BS_ .

 

·         David has published high quality photographic books entitled ‘European Robins’ and ‘European Robins 2’ in which some of the above and many other photographs of this species have been included.  See: https://www.bobbooks.co.uk/bookshop/photobook/european-robins and: https://www.bobbooks.co.uk/bookshop/photobook/european-robins-2 for details.

 

 

-> Birds 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140

 

 

-> Species Index, Common Names

 

-> Species Index, Scientific Names

 

-> Site Index

 

-> Home

 

© David Element